•  Uptown Theater, Washington, D.C. (Credit: Highsmith, Carol M., photographer, Library of Congress)
    Star Wars Premieres in Washington
     
     
    The Washington, D.C. premiere of Star Wars at the Uptown Theater in 1977 created pandemonium and was an early bellwether of its nation-wide success.
  • Student protesters face down riot police on Route 1, University of Maryland, 1970 (Photo source: University of Maryland Special Collections)
    It Happened Here
     
     
    When President Nixon announced the U.S. invasion of Cambodia in the spring of 1970, the College Park erupted in the "biggest and most violent" protest in University of Maryland history.
  • In the early morning hours of May 9, 1970 President Nixon drove to the Lincoln Memorial and mingled with a group of anti-war demonstrators. Here, Nixon chats with Barbara Hirsch, 24, of Cleveland, Ohio (left) and Lauree Moss, of Detroit, Mich. (Photo: © Bettmann/CORBIS)
    Strange But True
     
     
    Just days after the Kent State tragedy, President Nixon made a bizarre pre-dawn visit to the Lincoln Memorial to talk with anti-war protesters.
  • Portrait of Josiah Henson, 1876
    A truth stranger than fiction
     
     
    He was immortalized in Harriet Beecher Stowe's famous novel. But though it made him a well-known and popular figure in the nineteenth century, Josiah Henson was determined to tell his own story.
  • New York Giants outfielder Willie Mays poses at the Polo Grounds in New York City on June 9, 1951. (AP Photo)
    Baseball in Hagerstown
     
     
    Few people skip their senior prom to play baseball in Hagerstown, Maryland, but few people in history have also hit 660 home runs and played in 24 All-Star games.

The First Delegate

Norton Chipman

A century before Walter Fauntroy and Julius Hobson competed for the modern District Delegate seat, another man held the seat. His election and the eventual elimination of his seat are a lesser known part of the history of race and democracy in the District.

Dr. Loguen-Fraser in Puerto Plata. (Source: Wikipedia).

Dr. Loguen-Fraser's Solemn Vow

To close off Women's History Month, learn about Sarah Marinda Loguen Fraser, the first woman to receive an M.D. from the Syracuse University College of Medicine, and the fourth Black woman to become a licensed physician in the United States. While her extraordinary life took her all around the world, including New York, the Dominican Republic and France, some of the most important landmarks of her life happened in Washington, D.C.

George E.C. Hayes, Thurgood Marshall, and James Nabrit Jr congratulate each other outside of the Supreme Court on the day of the decision

James Nabrit Jr and His Uncompromising Assault on Segregation

James Nabrit Jr came to the District as an up-and-coming Howard law professor. He developed the first course at an American law school on civil rights law and instilled in his students an unrelenting belief in the immorality and impracticality of the Plessy v. Ferguson decision. As the lead counsel for the District's Bolling v. Sharpe case, Nabrit championed the position of attacking segregation outright, instead of relying on equalization. He pushed Thurgood Marshall and the NAACP to sharpen their attacks on school segregation and strongly influenced the outcome of all of the Brown v. Board school cases.

Charles Hamilton Houston

Charles Hamilton Houston and His Civil Rights Brain Trust

Charles Hamilton Houston is referred to as the "architect" of the civil rights movement. Before helping the Consolidated Parent Group kickoff their legal case, Houston built up the Howard University Law School into a world-class legal institution and mentored some of the most important figures of the civil rights movement, including Thurgood Marshall.

Portrait of Margaret Bayard Smith

Margaret Bayard Smith: A Writer of Washington

Anyone who reads The First Forty Years of Washington Society will form an image of Margaret Bayard Smith as a lively social butterfly and busybody. After all, her published letters seem like the nineteenth-century equivalent of a gossip column. What readers may not realize is that, just like her husband, Margaret was an accomplished writer. In nineteenth-century Washington, she was well-known as an author in her own right, not just a socialite.

Pages