• Jennifer Keelan-Chaffins wears a bandana as she crawls up the U.S. Capitol steps on her hands and knees. On her left is a man bending over and on her right a woman moves up the stairs on her back. All three protesters wear matching light blue shirts from the ADAPT organization. In front of them are media personnel with cameras and microphones recording the protest. ​​​​​[Photo Credit: Associated Press]
    Civil Rights
     
     
    When Congressional delay jeopardized the Americans with Disabilities Act, protesters responded with a powerful demonstration on the Capitol steps.
  • The Peacock Room (Source: Wikipedia, used via CC BY-SA 2.0)
    Art History
     
     
    When the Smithsonian dragged its feet, Teddy Roosevelt stepped in to secure one of the world greatest art collections for the nation.
  • Frank Kameny marches with campaign volunteers
    LBGT Rights
     
     
    In 1971 Washington’s leading LGBT activist became the first openly gay man to run for Congress. In just a two month campaign, Frank Kameny put gay rights on D.C.'s political agenda- and made them stick.
  • Map of Prince William County, Virginia illustrating the proposed location of Disney's America (orange) in relation to the town of Haymarket (below the park in yellow) and the Manassas National Battlefield Park (to the right in green). [Source: Wikimedia Commons]
    Disney’s America
     
     
    Disney's controversial plans for a theme park in Prince William County led officials to question whether the dreams that you wish really do come true.
Dr. Loguen-Fraser in Puerto Plata. (Source: Wikipedia).

Dr. Loguen-Fraser's Solemn Vow

To close off Women's History Month, learn about Sarah Marinda Loguen Fraser, the first woman to receive an M.D. from the Syracuse University College of Medicine, and the fourth Black woman to become a licensed physician in the United States. While her extraordinary life took her all around the world, including New York, the Dominican Republic and France, some of the most important landmarks of her life happened in Washington, D.C.

George E.C. Hayes, Thurgood Marshall, and James Nabrit Jr congratulate each other outside of the Supreme Court on the day of the decision

James Nabrit Jr and His Uncompromising Assault on Segregation

James Nabrit Jr came to the District as an up-and-coming Howard law professor. He developed the first course at an American law school on civil rights law and instilled in his students an unrelenting belief in the immorality and impracticality of the Plessy v. Ferguson decision. As the lead counsel for the District's Bolling v. Sharpe case, Nabrit championed the position of attacking segregation outright, instead of relying on equalization. He pushed Thurgood Marshall and the NAACP to sharpen their attacks on school segregation and strongly influenced the outcome of all of the Brown v. Board school cases.

Charles Hamilton Houston

Charles Hamilton Houston and His Civil Rights Brain Trust

Charles Hamilton Houston is referred to as the "architect" of the civil rights movement. Before helping the Consolidated Parent Group kickoff their legal case, Houston built up the Howard University Law School into a world-class legal institution and mentored some of the most important figures of the civil rights movement, including Thurgood Marshall.

Portrait of Margaret Bayard Smith

Margaret Bayard Smith: A Writer of Washington

Anyone who reads The First Forty Years of Washington Society will form an image of Margaret Bayard Smith as a lively social butterfly and busybody. After all, her published letters seem like the nineteenth-century equivalent of a gossip column. What readers may not realize is that, just like her husband, Margaret was an accomplished writer. In nineteenth-century Washington, she was well-known as an author in her own right, not just a socialite.

Statuary and Dignitaries

Joan of Arc statue (Source: Charlotte Muth)

If you take a stroll through Meridian Hill Park in Columbia Heights, you will find two noteworthy statues: on the lower level, a standing figure of the Italian poet, Dante Alighieri; on the upper terrace, an equestrian statue of the French saint, Jeanne d’Arc, or, Joan of Arc, anglicized. Interestingly enough, these two artworks were unveiled at the park within one month of each other—Dante on Dec. 2, 1921, and Jeanne following on Jan. 6, 1922. Walking past these serene bronze monuments, few would guess their pivotal role a century-old saga when rumored remarks in Washington led to riots in Europe.

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