• Alexander Gardner with his camera
    A tale of two photographers
     
     
    In Civil War-era DC, the most famous photography studio was run by two photographers whose partnership endured its own civil war
  • Bob Dylan in 1963 as pictured in St. Lawrence University yearbook. (Source: Wikipedia)
    Music History
     
     
    When Bob Dylan played the Washington Coliseum in 1965, a local photographer sneaked backstage and took a photo that ended up winning a Grammy for Best Album cover.
  • Storefront of Bassins restaurant in Washington, which was torched by Salvatore Cottones operation in the 1980s.
    True Crime Stories
     
     
    Drug-dealing. Arson. Attempted murder. The true story of the Sicilian crime syndicate that operated from the backrooms of D.C. pizzerias.
  • Summer Protest
     
     
    In 1966, children swam in a fountain in front of Union Station to bring attention to their lack of access to pools and recreation facilities.
  • Bob Hope wearing a Cleveland Indians uniform in the 1960s. (Photo source: Bettmann/Getty)
    DC Baseball History
     
     
    In 1968, the Washington Senators sought new ownership. Bob Hope, the esteemed comedian, was interested.

Death Over the Potomac

National Airport Tower and Landing Strip, circa 1950

In 1949, a shocking mid-air crash near National Airport killed more people than any previous air disaster in U.S. history. It did not take long for investigators to place the blame on one unlucky pilot. But was Capt. Erick Rios Bridoux really at fault?

We'wha Visits the Capital

We'wha weaving (Source: Wikipedia)

Before 1885, We’wha had never seen a city, and the city of Washington, D.C. had never seen a person quite like We’wha. Alongside being a pottery maker and cultural ambassador, We’wha was a lhamana, who in the Zuni tradition are male-bodied people who also possess female attributes. Existing outside of the Western gender binary, lhamana have always inhabited a special role in Zuni society, as intermediaries between men and women, who perform special cultural and spiritual duties. More recent scholarship coined the term Two Spirit "as a means of unifying various gender identities and expressions of Native American / First Nations / Indigenous individuals."

A white rectangular poster depicts a message handwritten by a Gallaudet student during the “Deaf President Now” protests. “To Board of Trustees” is written at the top of the poster followed by an image of a coiled red snake. Below the snake is a statement in capital letters that reads “Don’t tread on Gallaudet we want a deaf presidents now and demand four things. Deaf never give up.”

Bet on Gallaudet

Against the backdrop of the city, Gallaudet University students, faculty, and alumni transformed their campus protest into a national fight for civil rights, refusing to accept anything less than a “Deaf President Now.” 

The First Sting

Lt. Robert Arscott and the Operation Sting team sit amid stolen goods

In 1976 D.C. police dressed as cartoon Mafiosos and bought millions in stolen goods from local thieves. They called it "Operation Sting," and soon police across the country were launching "sting operations" of their own. But not everyone was so enamored with the tactic, especially the communities it was being used to target.

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