• Orson Welles
    Orson Welles
     
     
    Washingtonians reacted to Orson Welles' 1938 "War of the Worlds" broadcast with some pretty interesting commentary on American culture and world events.
  • Photo of the 100 block of North Fairfax Street, 1961-1965. (Photo source: Wikimedia Commons.)
    Haunted Alexandria
     
     
    What really happened to the woman who supposedly burned to death on the night before her wedding day? What about her groom? And what if she never left Old Town?
  • Self-portrait of Clover Adams. (Photo Source: Wikimedia Commons)
    Haunted Washington
     
     
    Clover Adams, the ghost of DC's iconic Hay-Adams Hotel, has supposedly been a guest for over 130 years...that's one late checkout.
  • Oak Hill Cemetery in Washington, D.C. (Source: Library of Congress)
    A History of the Morbid Trade
     
     
    In the nineteenth century, grave robbers haunted Washington’s many graveyards and potter’s fields in the cover of night, acquiring bodies to sell to local medical colleges.
  • Bunny Man Bridge in Clifton, Virginia has haunted local teens for decades. (Photo source: Flickr user Motoboy92 used via CC BY-NC 2.0)
    Local Mystery
     
     
    If you were a teenager in western Fairfax County, you probably visited Bunny Man Bridge. Now read the creepy story behind it.
Redskins quarterback Sammy Baugh in 1937. (Source: Library of Congress)

The Redskins Rule and the Election

Well, the Redskins may have trouble winning football games these days, but they have proven quite effective at predicting presidential elections over the years. Since the team moved to Washington in 1937 there have been 18 presidential elections. In 17 of those, the so-called "Redskins Rule" has held up:

If the Redskins win their last home game before the election, the incumbent's party will win the election and keep the White House. If the Redskins lose, the challenging party's candidate will win the election.

So, what does this mean about this year's election?

A Friday Photo: Jazz for the Bears

A Friday Photo: Jazz for the Bears

I came across this photo while doing some research about the National Zoo. It's a picture of jazz quintet playing a concert for a polar bear in the 1920s. Errr... what? I'd really like to know what precipitated this. Did these dudes just wake up one morning and say, "Hey, let's go down to the zoo and play a set for the bears." "Good idea, I'll see if Gertrude is free to dance for them."? Well, in any case, the bear seems to be enjoying it. Or maybe he's just waiting for his chance to take a swipe at them through the bars.

See the full size photo »

Southern Maryland Dutch Country

Amish horse and buggy on the road in Southern Maryland. (Courtesy of St. Mary's College of Southern Maryland Archives.)

Amish horses and buggies in the Washington, D.C. Metro area? Yep. It's true. Over 200 Amish families live and work in St. Mary’s and Charles counties in Maryland, less than 40 miles from downtown D.C. The settlement, which is centered around the town of Charlotte Hall, dates to 1939 when seven families migrated to the area from Bird-in-Hand, Pennsylvania for the cheap Maryland land(!) and to escape pressure from the Pennsylvania state government.

The Legend of the Bunny Man

Bunny Man Bridge in Clifton, Virginia has haunted local teens for decades. (Photo source: Flickr user Motoboy92)

You’re sixteen years old, caught up in the intoxicating freedom that comes with your new driver’s license, and it’s Halloween night. You and your friends are driving around your small town looking for a quiet place far away from adult supervision. You decide to park on the side of the road near a secluded railway overpass. It’s the perfect place to get “up to something,” as your mother would say: woods creeping up on either side and the complete darkness you can only find on rural roads without streetlamps or nearby houses.

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