Alcohol

John Adlum (1759-1836)

Cleveland Park’s Very Own Vineyard

Local wine sales have reached record heights in recent years. But even though Virginia and Maryland’s 350+ wineries are beginning to enjoy the fermented fruits of their labor, the west coast remains the hub of wine production in the United States. Over 92% of the country’s wine is produced on the west coast and Napa Valley remains the recognized capital of American wine. However, the area's amateur sommeliers can take pride in the fact that John Adlum, “father of American viticulture,” called D.C. home.

D.C.'s Illustrious Brewing Past and Present

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<p>It's <a href="http://dcbeerweek.net">D.C. Beer Week</a>, the annual "celebration of good beer in the National Capital Region from conception to consumption and everyone and everything in between." The fact that (1) such a celebration exists and (2) there are events all over town; is an indication of Washington's growing reputation for quality suds. Indeed, the last few years have seen a huge increase in the number of local breweries and they are doing some very interesting things with America's favorite alcoholic beverage.</p>

<p>Needless to say, the scene hasn't always been so bustling, and we wanted to learn more about the history of brewing in our fair city. So,&nbsp;we sat down with two people who should know: beer historian Garrett Peck, author of <a href="http://www.amazon.com/dp/1626194416/ref=as_sl_pc_tf_lc?tag=garrpeck-20&a... Beer: A Heady History of Brewing in Washington, D.C.</em></a> (available at Amazon.com and fine booksellers everywhere) and Kristi Griner, head brewer at <a href="http://capcitybrew.com">Capital City Brewing Company</a>.</p>

The District's Claim to the Daiquiri

Though it may not really feel like it when you go outside lately, spring is almost here. It won't be long before people all over the DMV are sipping drinks by the pool. Pina coladas... mojitos... and, of course, everyone's favorite homegrown cocktail, the daiquiri.

Ummm...?

Okay, okay, the daiquiri is not truly a Washington creation -- it was first mixed in Cuba -- but it has a strong early connection to the District. So, we have some basis to claim it. Read on!

Happy Repeal Day, Maryland and Virginia! (Sorry, D.C.)

Washington Post headline

Repeal Day, December 5, 1933, was a day of wild celebration. The 18th Amendment was repealed, ending the great experiment known as Prohibition. Booze could finally start flowing again (legally) across the country and Americans were eager to imbibe. But, as kegs were tapped and bottles were uncorked from coast to coast, one place was left out of the party: Washington, D.C.