• Summer Protest
     
     
    In 1966, children swam in a fountain in front of Union Station to bring attention to their lack of access to pools and recreation facilities.
  • Currier and Ives, The Assassination of Lincoln at Ford's Theater, April 14, 1865. (Photo Source: Wikipedia)
    Lincoln Assassination
     
     
    The tragic but little-known story of Clara Harris and Henry Rathbone, who were with Abraham Lincoln the night he was shot.
  • Dr. S. M. Johnson stands next to the Zero Milestone marker. (Photo source: Library of Congress)
    The Zero Milestone
     
     
    In the 1920s, proponents of the Good Roads Movement tried to make D.C. the center of the Western Hemisphere, at least as far as highways were concerned.
  • Brumidi's Apotheosis of Washington. (Photo source: Architect of the Capitol)
    Art History
     
     
    19th-Century Italian-American artist Constantino Brumidi's frescoes and murals can be seen throughout the U.S. Capitol.

Death Over the Potomac

National Airport Tower and Landing Strip, circa 1950

In 1949, a shocking mid-air crash near National Airport killed more people than any previous air disaster in U.S. history. It did not take long for investigators to place the blame on one unlucky pilot. But was Capt. Erick Rios Bridoux really at fault?

We'wha Visits the Capital

We'wha weaving (Source: Wikipedia)

Before 1885, We’wha had never seen a city, and the city of Washington, D.C. had never seen a person quite like We’wha. Alongside being a pottery maker and cultural ambassador, We’wha was a lhamana, who in the Zuni tradition are male-bodied people who also possess female attributes. Existing outside of the Western gender binary, lhamana have always inhabited a special role in Zuni society, as intermediaries between men and women, who perform special cultural and spiritual duties. More recent scholarship coined the term Two Spirit "as a means of unifying various gender identities and expressions of Native American / First Nations / Indigenous individuals."

A white rectangular poster depicts a message handwritten by a Gallaudet student during the “Deaf President Now” protests. “To Board of Trustees” is written at the top of the poster followed by an image of a coiled red snake. Below the snake is a statement in capital letters that reads “Don’t tread on Gallaudet we want a deaf presidents now and demand four things. Deaf never give up.”

Bet on Gallaudet

Against the backdrop of the city, Gallaudet University students, faculty, and alumni transformed their campus protest into a national fight for civil rights, refusing to accept anything less than a “Deaf President Now.” 

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