• Black and white photo of six OSS recruits who watch an instructor shoot a small arm during training at Chopawamsic's Area C. [Source: National Park Service]
    Prince William Forest Park
     
     
    Secrets in the Forest
    Your mission, should you choose to accept it, is to begin your training as a World War II spy in the forests of Prince William County, Virginia.
  • Row of rundown homes on 7th St SW
    D.C. Housing
     
     
    Through a fluke of fate, Minnie Keyes inherited many of Washington’s most rundown properties. She was not going to let anyone take them from her.
  • Storefront of Bassins restaurant in Washington, which was torched by Salvatore Cottones operation in the 1980s.
    True Crime Stories
     
     
    Drug-dealing. Arson. Attempted murder. The true story of the Sicilian crime syndicate that operated from the backrooms of D.C. pizzerias.
  • Inmates shouting through D.C. Jail window during the hostage standoff on October 11, 1972. (Photo Credit: Unknown, Courtesy DC Public Library, Star Collection, © Washington Post, All Rights Reserved.)
    One minute Washington Post reporter William Claiborne was asleep in his bed, the next he was negotiating a hostage situation at the D.C. Jail.
  • Francis Blackwell Mayer's painting of the burning of the Peggy Stewart during the Annapolis Tea Party in 1774. (Source: Maryland State Archives)
    Colonial Days
     
     
    The Boston Tea party wasn't the only colonial protest against British taxation. Annapolis residents had their own dramatic demonstration in 1774.

Man Missing: Scarlet Crow's Fateful Visit to Washington, D.C.

Scarlet Crow's gravestone at Congressional Cemetery

On the night of February 24, 1867 in the nation’s capital, Scarlet Crow, a visiting Sioux chief, mysteriously disappeared. No one knows for sure what happened. Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate oral history proposed that he was kidnapped, while the Evening Star newspaper put forth that he had simply wandered and gotten lost. What is indisputable, however, is that after that night, Scarlet Crow was never seen alive again. 

Savior or Slumlord?

Row of rundown homes on 7th St SW

In 1933, eleven words made Minnie Keyes a wealthy woman. They were scrawled on a blank telegram slip, tied to a pencil with an elastic band, and stuffed under a mattress. “Minnie Keyes: You have been good to me. All is yours.” These sentences were the final will and testament of Leonard A. Hamilton, who had lived as a boarder at Keyes’ home for 30 years. Once a court accepted the scrap as legitimate, Keyes inherited Hamilton’s $100,000 estate, about $2.1 million in today’s money. Most of its value lay in real estate: dozens of homes scattered across Washington. The properties Minnie Keyes came to own, however, were not the city’s best. And what should happen to them became the source of great debate.

Death Over the Potomac

National Airport Tower and Landing Strip, circa 1950

In 1949, a shocking mid-air crash near National Airport killed more people than any previous air disaster in U.S. history. It did not take long for investigators to place the blame on one unlucky pilot. But was Capt. Erick Rios Bridoux really at fault?

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